Gold: $1640.90  Silver: $18.95  Platinum: $870.50  90% Junk $1 FV: $13.55  Gold/Silver Ratio: 86.59

Circulated Silver Half Dollars

Pre-1965 90% Silver Half Dollars Coins

Ben Franklin Halves, Walking Liberty Halves, 1965 Kennedy Halves

Half dollar silver coins were extremely important to the economy during the gold and silver standards. Each silver half dollar contains .3575 troy ounces of silver. Minting...


How to buy the cheapest Circulated Silver Half Dollars

FindBullionPrices.com searches over 30 national and reputable bullion dealers to find the lowest prices on Circulated Silver Half Dollars. The prices on our site are updated hourly and adjusted for silver spot price. This gives you the tools to compare silver prices and compare Circulated Silver Half Dollars prices. This helps you get the best prices on Circulated Silver Half Dollars.

We find the best prices for the cheapest Circulated Silver Half Dollars when you're ready to buy

You can find a large variety of silver coins at FindBullionPrices.com. If we don't list prices for something you're looking for Contact Us and let us know so we can add it.

Compare Circulated Silver Half Dollars prices

We compare prices of Circulated Silver Half Dollars from top-reviewed and trusted bullion dealers. Our product listings compare the online prices to help you buy the cheapest Circulated Silver Half Dollars.

Quick Facts About Circulated Silver Half Dollars

90% Half Dollar Value

  • 50 cent coins were minted from an alloy of 90% silver up until 1964. Clad coins were introduced in 1965.
  • Condition of coins will vary due to circulation. Older coins like the Walking Liberty Half Dollars will show more signs of wear and coins may be visually thinner than newer coins.
  • Most stackers prefer Franklin and Kennedy half dollars because they saw less handling in day to day transactions and everyday shopping. It's a generally accepted belief by many investors that the silver half dollars coins minted in the early 1960s will be closest to mint state or uncirculated condition and provide the most silver when buying in face value increments.
  • Silver Half Dollars are a trusted fractional form of silver that has been used for bartering and everyday trade in goods and services for more than 100 years. These coins fit in standard $10 bank rolls and plastic tubes that hold 20 coins each. Coin rolls and tubes offer an easy and cost effective way to establish a foundational store of value at home.
  • Beginning in 1965, most Americans began to hoard and save silver half dollars due to the intrinsic value of the metal. Americans that had lived through the experience of the Great Depression and Gold Confiscation of the 1930s had an understanding of value that is often misunderstood today.

Circulated Silver Half Dollars History & Facts

Face Value vs Weight Debate

Most online bullion dealers sell junk silver based on the face value amount of the legal tender coins.

Online bullion dealers do this to make the math simple and easy when shopping for junk silver as it provides a fairly standard methodology for measuring.

The determination that a $1 face value roll of pre-1965 silver coins contains .715 troy ounces of silver is based on coins the weight of the coins when they were minted. Small amounts of silver are slowly scraped off over time due to circulation. It is the reason why many Walking Liberty Half Dollar coins are thinner than their Kennedy counterparts.

Heavily circulated and cull condition coins are visibly thinner to the naked eye when compared to a uncirculated coin.

Not all $10 Face Value rolls contain equal amounts of silver. Heavily circulated, worn, cull and damaged coins contain less silver than uncirculated coins

This includes half dollars that are sold with partial or no dates. Individually, the weight difference is hardly noticeable. When comparing two stacks of $10 Face Value Half Dollars side-by-side, a stack containing slick, no dates and cull walking liberty coins will be noticeably shorter.

When buying junk silver in bulk, which includes any large amount of face value, it is best to purchase coins from newer mintages due to the intrinsic value that can be lost due to circulation. This becomes more and more obvious with smaller denomination silver coins that would have been handled much more frequently than larger coins.